SUSTAINABLE RIVERS PROGRAM
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Sustainable Rivers Program - News & Features

Projects restore floodplain ecosystems while reducing flood risk

Floodplains are extremely productive ecosystems that support high levels of biodiversity and provide valuable ecosystem services that directly benefit society. One high profile study concluded floodplains ranked second among ecosystem types based on the monetary value of their ecosystem services, which include flood attenuation, fisheries, groundwater recharge, water filtration and recreation. However, to function as diverse, productive ecosystems, floodplains must periodically flood.
Published: 1/18/2008

New technology improves river management

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy have joined forces to develop the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s Regime Prescription Tool (HEC RPT), a software program to help teams reach agreements on managing the flow regime of a river.
Published: 10/19/2007

Joint project looks at Texas watershed

A large portion of the central United States is still under drought conditions, which has forced many to protect and preserve the current sources of water and to seek future sources. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District has agreed to work with numerous resource organizations to study how reservoir operations have affected ecological conditions in the Big Cypress Bayou and Caddo Lake in the piney woods of east Texas.
Published: 7/20/2007

Joint team travels to China

Stan Simpson, a Corps water manager for the Savannah River Basin, recently joined a team from the Conservancy and traveled to China, where a series of dams on the Yangtze are planned. The Conservancy is conducting a series of workshops, led by Andy Warner, to define the environmental flow needs of the river and to find a way to meet the needs of nature and the growing Chinese population, so both can continue to thrive.
Published: 4/20/2007

Corps and The Nature Conservancy develop joint training

The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) are working together to develop training courses that emphasize connections between hydrology and ecology and to outline how those connections can be taken into account in water resource management. Currently, two courses are offered as joint training opportunities, with each course being held once a year through the Corps’ Learning Center.
Published: 1/19/2007

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem

This is the third in a series of articles about the Sustainable Rivers Partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy. In 2002, the Corps implemented an interim plan designed with The Nature Conservancy to create more natural regimes of flow and stream temperature by changing the ways that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved and officially integrated into the water management policies of Louisville District.
Published: 10/20/2006

Ecosystem flows defined for Bill Williams River

Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of articles about the Sustainable Rivers Partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy. The Bill Williams River was one of nine rivers enrolled at the inception of the Sustainable Rivers Project (SRP). The SRP, which started in 2002, is an ongoing nationwide partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy to improve the health and life of rivers by changing the operations of Corps dams, while maintaining or enhancing project benefits.
Published: 10/20/2005

River project brings together Corps, The Nature Conservancy

This is the first in a recurring series of articles about the Sustainable Rivers partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy are collaborating on a broad array of projects, including reservoir management, dam removal, floodplain and wetland restoration, and coastal zone work. Based on number of projects, the Conservancy is now the largest nonfederal sponsor for Corps ecosystem restoration projects.
Published: 4/22/2005