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ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  Exposure to flooding and other environmental hazards often fall disproportionately on the most vulnerable people in our communities. Those who lack access to education, adequate housing, economic resources, health care, and social networks have the fewest resources to prepare for a flood and often live in the highest-risk locations.  Children, the elderly, and those with physical disabilities are also more vulnerable. 
“Social effects, in a water resources context, refer to how the constituents of life that influence personal and group definitions of satisfaction, well-being, and happiness, are affected by some water resources condition or proposed intervention, ” said Susan Durden, a senior economist at the U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water Resources (IWR).  
Since social vulnerability is one of those key social effects, the USACE has developed a new primer entitled Identification and Engagement of Socially Vulnerable Populations to address vulnerable populations in evaluating potential projects, studies, or regulatory decisions.  The primer is intended to help Corps personnel and its partners understand the importance of identifying and engaging those individuals and groups who are more vulnerable to floods and other environmental hazards. It will be useful to all USACE programs and can also serve other government agency programs.
Shared Vision Planning to Reduce Urban Flood Risk in Thailand
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Exposure to flooding and other environmental hazards often fall disproportionately on the most vulnerable people in our communities. Those who lack access to education, adequate housing, economic resources, health care, and social networks have the fewest resources to prepare for a flood and often live in the highest-risk locations. Children, the elderly, and those with physical disabilities are also more vulnerable. “Social effects, in a water resources context, refer to how the constituents of life that influence personal and group definitions of satisfaction, well-being, and happiness, are affected by some water resources condition or proposed intervention, ” said Susan Durden, a senior economist at the U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water Resources (IWR). Since social vulnerability is one of those key social effects, the USACE has developed a new primer entitled Identification and Engagement of Socially Vulnerable Populations to address vulnerable populations in evaluating potential projects, studies, or regulatory decisions. The primer is intended to help Corps personnel and its partners understand the importance of identifying and engaging those individuals and groups who are more vulnerable to floods and other environmental hazards. It will be useful to all USACE programs and can also serve other government agency programs.
MARRAKECH, MOROCCO.   The public roll-out of the new mobile App iRAIN took place during the United Nations 22nd Conference of the Parties (COP22’s) Water Day earlier this month in Marrakech, Morocco.   Robert Pietrowsky, Director of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR) and International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM), represented the U.S. government in its collaboration on the App with the University California at Irvine’s Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) and UNESCO’s International Hydrological Programme (IHP).    

iRAIN is a revolutionary App developed by Dr. Phu Nguyen at CHRS that provides for the first time, mobile access to near real-time rainfall estimates to everyone, at any time, and anywhere in the world.  It represents an invitation for people everywhere to observe the impacts of the climate on the water cycle while facilitating their involvement in collecting local data for global precipitation monitoring. 

It allows users to visualize real-time global satellite precipitation observations, track extreme precipitation events worldwide, and report local rainfall information using crowd-sourcing functionality of the App to supplement the data. A useful feature of iRain is that real-time rainfall observation data can be easily shared through social networks such as Facebook and Twitter.  Currently, iRain is available for iOS. A version for Android devices is under development.
iRAIN: New Mobile App Supports Water Management Around the World
MARRAKECH, MOROCCO. The public roll-out of the new mobile App iRAIN took place during the United Nations 22nd Conference of the Parties (COP22’s) Water Day earlier this month in Marrakech, Morocco. Robert Pietrowsky, Director of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR) and International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM), represented the U.S. government in its collaboration on the App with the University California at Irvine’s Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) and UNESCO’s International Hydrological Programme (IHP). iRAIN is a revolutionary App developed by Dr. Phu Nguyen at CHRS that provides for the first time, mobile access to near real-time rainfall estimates to everyone, at any time, and anywhere in the world. It represents an invitation for people everywhere to observe the impacts of the climate on the water cycle while facilitating their involvement in collecting local data for global precipitation monitoring. It allows users to visualize real-time global satellite precipitation observations, track extreme precipitation events worldwide, and report local rainfall information using crowd-sourcing functionality of the App to supplement the data. A useful feature of iRain is that real-time rainfall observation data can be easily shared through social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Currently, iRain is available for iOS. A version for Android devices is under development.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Last month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Rock Island District, Institute for Water Resources, and local partners held a “Multi-Hazard Tournament” (MHT) in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A MHT is a simulation exercise designed to aid decision-making by playing out potential strategies to reduce drought, flood risk, and other water-related risks. The tournament challenged Iowa-Cedar river basin stakeholders to jointly address issues of major flooding, severe droughts, and water quality. 

Broken into seven teams, the hum and competitive energy could be felt as teams discussed their options to reduce the impacts of forecasted climate conditions on the basin. Sixty participants ranged from federal, state, and local governments to academia, non-governmental organizations, and the agricultural sector. Investment options included restoring or adding wetland spaces, reclaiming property, raising houses out of flood zones, infrastructure improvements, and reinforcing levees. 

Participants quickly grew frustrated as they found their allotted funds for annual investments, based on realistic funding options in the Cedar River basin, significantly limited their ability to invest in basin infrastructure on an annual basis. Facing this limitation, teams began to innovate on how to capitalize on investments made in the previous turns and the importance of thinking strategically about long-term investments.
Playing for Keeps: Using Game Theory to Address Flooding and Drought in the Cedar River Basin
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Last month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Rock Island District, Institute for Water Resources, and local partners held a “Multi-Hazard Tournament” (MHT) in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A MHT is a simulation exercise designed to aid decision-making by playing out potential strategies to reduce drought, flood risk, and other water-related risks. The tournament challenged Iowa-Cedar river basin stakeholders to jointly address issues of major flooding, severe droughts, and water quality. Broken into seven teams, the hum and competitive energy could be felt as teams discussed their options to reduce the impacts of forecasted climate conditions on the basin. Sixty participants ranged from federal, state, and local governments to academia, non-governmental organizations, and the agricultural sector. Investment options included restoring or adding wetland spaces, reclaiming property, raising houses out of flood zones, infrastructure improvements, and reinforcing levees. Participants quickly grew frustrated as they found their allotted funds for annual investments, based on realistic funding options in the Cedar River basin, significantly limited their ability to invest in basin infrastructure on an annual basis. Facing this limitation, teams began to innovate on how to capitalize on investments made in the previous turns and the importance of thinking strategically about long-term investments.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   On July 13, 2016, colleagues and friends gathered in honor of Dr. Jerome (Jerry) Delli Priscoli’s retirement from 41 years of government service. At the forefront of national and international public policy concerning water, Delli Priscoli served as a Senior Advisor at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources. Dr. Delli Priscoli is a skilled mediator and facilitator on the international circuit. He is recognized as a world leader in conflict management, water resources policy and governance, and water security.

LEGACY
A look back on Dr. Delli Priscoli tells a story of a career devoted to international water issues and environmental ethics. In 1995, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) program, created by Delli Priscoli, received the first Hammer award for efficiency in government from Vice President Gore. Dr. Delli Priscoli is also the recipient of the 2005 Icko Iben award for achievement in cross disciplinary communications in water, which is presented annually by the American Water Resources Association (AWRA). He has worked extensively with the World Bank, UNESCO, WHO, and many other international organizations. As a principal advocate of the USACE transformation toward open administration, Delli Priscoli was ahead of his time in many respects.
Dr. Delli Priscoli’s Legacy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. On July 13, 2016, colleagues and friends gathered in honor of Dr. Jerome (Jerry) Delli Priscoli’s retirement from 41 years of government service. At the forefront of national and international public policy concerning water, Delli Priscoli served as a Senior Advisor at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources. Dr. Delli Priscoli is a skilled mediator and facilitator on the international circuit. He is recognized as a world leader in conflict management, water resources policy and governance, and water security. LEGACY A look back on Dr. Delli Priscoli tells a story of a career devoted to international water issues and environmental ethics. In 1995, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) program, created by Delli Priscoli, received the first Hammer award for efficiency in government from Vice President Gore. Dr. Delli Priscoli is also the recipient of the 2005 Icko Iben award for achievement in cross disciplinary communications in water, which is presented annually by the American Water Resources Association (AWRA). He has worked extensively with the World Bank, UNESCO, WHO, and many other international organizations. As a principal advocate of the USACE transformation toward open administration, Delli Priscoli was ahead of his time in many respects.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  To help support the mission and aid in better decision-making, the USACE’s Institute for Water Resources and the USACE Readiness Support Center have collaborated on the development and use of computer models that provide emergency managers and responders with a first look at the potential severity of a storm and are intended to set the “scale and scope” of the storm event and potential mission assignments.   
“The results of these models are also shared with other federal, state and local partners to help them make better risk informed decisions during the response and recovery phases of an event,” stated IWR’s Chad Markin, the USACE Lead for the Disaster Impact Modeling efforts.  
Through the use of these geospatial tools, the USACE can provide estimates of possible debris volumes, number of people and households likely within hurricane force winds, and possible temporary roofing, temporary housing needs, and potential impacts to critical infrastructure starting about three days prior to a forecasted hurricane landfall.  The models are then updated every 6 hours when new advisories are issued by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) or Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) forecast times, the speed of a storm and estimated time of landfall.
USACE Computer Model Critical to the Corps Hurricane Matthew Response
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. To help support the mission and aid in better decision-making, the USACE’s Institute for Water Resources and the USACE Readiness Support Center have collaborated on the development and use of computer models that provide emergency managers and responders with a first look at the potential severity of a storm and are intended to set the “scale and scope” of the storm event and potential mission assignments. “The results of these models are also shared with other federal, state and local partners to help them make better risk informed decisions during the response and recovery phases of an event,” stated IWR’s Chad Markin, the USACE Lead for the Disaster Impact Modeling efforts. Through the use of these geospatial tools, the USACE can provide estimates of possible debris volumes, number of people and households likely within hurricane force winds, and possible temporary roofing, temporary housing needs, and potential impacts to critical infrastructure starting about three days prior to a forecasted hurricane landfall. The models are then updated every 6 hours when new advisories are issued by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) or Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) forecast times, the speed of a storm and estimated time of landfall.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  This summer a team from the USACE’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR) comprised of Drs. William Logan, Jennifer Olszewski, and Guillermo Mendoza, led a training workshop in the Dominican Republic to help prepare a project management plan (PMP) using a Shared Vision Planning (SVP) process for the city of Santiago de Caballeros. SVP integrates traditional water resources planning processes with structured public participation and collaborative computer modeling. The engagement included CORASAAN (Corporación del Acueducto y Alcantarillado de Santiago, the city's water utility company), INDRHI (Instituto Nacional de Recursos Hidráulicos, the national water resources institute), the Engineering Department of the Catholic University of Madre Maestra, as well as stakeholders from irrigation districts and the Ministry of the Environment. Representatives from the hydropower industry were not present at this meeting but plans for their engagement were developed.  
During the workshop, the Dominican PMP teams, with IWR assistance, developed a work plan for the sustainable management of water resources in the Yaque del Norte basin.  The group developed a problem statement, objectives, metrics and a conceptual decision support model as part of the SVP process.  The participants listed and prioritized the most important problems facing the upper, middle, and lower sub-basins within the Yaque del Norte basin.  Two examples of the problems they brought up include raw wastewater flowing into streams feeding irrigation channels, and irrigation channels with severe sedimentation.  In fact, the team members had an opportunity to see some of the issues in person during a site visit to a location where an irrigation channel is experiencing severe sedimentation.
Introducing Shared Vision Planning to the Dominican Republic
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. This summer a team from the USACE’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR) comprised of Drs. William Logan, Jennifer Olszewski, and Guillermo Mendoza, led a training workshop in the Dominican Republic to help prepare a project management plan (PMP) using a Shared Vision Planning (SVP) process for the city of Santiago de Caballeros. SVP integrates traditional water resources planning processes with structured public participation and collaborative computer modeling. The engagement included CORASAAN (Corporación del Acueducto y Alcantarillado de Santiago, the city's water utility company), INDRHI (Instituto Nacional de Recursos Hidráulicos, the national water resources institute), the Engineering Department of the Catholic University of Madre Maestra, as well as stakeholders from irrigation districts and the Ministry of the Environment. Representatives from the hydropower industry were not present at this meeting but plans for their engagement were developed. During the workshop, the Dominican PMP teams, with IWR assistance, developed a work plan for the sustainable management of water resources in the Yaque del Norte basin. The group developed a problem statement, objectives, metrics and a conceptual decision support model as part of the SVP process. The participants listed and prioritized the most important problems facing the upper, middle, and lower sub-basins within the Yaque del Norte basin. Two examples of the problems they brought up include raw wastewater flowing into streams feeding irrigation channels, and irrigation channels with severe sedimentation. In fact, the team members had an opportunity to see some of the issues in person during a site visit to a location where an irrigation channel is experiencing severe sedimentation.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  Representatives from the Mekong River Commission (MeRC) and Taiwan Water Resources Agency (TWRA) visited the National Capital Region office of the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) on 22 August 2016 to discuss opportunities for collaboration between various water management agencies in the Mekong River region and TWRA with members of IWR and its International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM).  The discussions focused on themes of flood risk management, transboundary water management issues, water supply, hydropower, sediment management, and collaborative planning techniques. 
Members of the Mekong River Commission including Mr. Pham Tuan Phan, Chief Executive Officer of the Commission, Dr. Inthavy Akhalath, acting Secretary General of the Lao National Mekong Committee Secretariat (LNMCS), and Dr. Phoumy Vongleck of the Lao Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (LMNRE) joined the discussion, along with Dr. Chien-Hsin Lai, Deputy Director General of the TWRA, and Dr. Song-Yue Yang of the TWRA and Water Resources Planning Institute. The visitors were escorted by Mr. John Emerson of USACE’s Pacific Ocean Division (POD) and Dr. Michelle Haynes of IWR.
Mekong River Commission and Taiwan Water Resources Agency Officials Visit IWR
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Representatives from the Mekong River Commission (MeRC) and Taiwan Water Resources Agency (TWRA) visited the National Capital Region office of the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) on 22 August 2016 to discuss opportunities for collaboration between various water management agencies in the Mekong River region and TWRA with members of IWR and its International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM). The discussions focused on themes of flood risk management, transboundary water management issues, water supply, hydropower, sediment management, and collaborative planning techniques. Members of the Mekong River Commission including Mr. Pham Tuan Phan, Chief Executive Officer of the Commission, Dr. Inthavy Akhalath, acting Secretary General of the Lao National Mekong Committee Secretariat (LNMCS), and Dr. Phoumy Vongleck of the Lao Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (LMNRE) joined the discussion, along with Dr. Chien-Hsin Lai, Deputy Director General of the TWRA, and Dr. Song-Yue Yang of the TWRA and Water Resources Planning Institute. The visitors were escorted by Mr. John Emerson of USACE’s Pacific Ocean Division (POD) and Dr. Michelle Haynes of IWR.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) has just released a new handbook entitled “Compensatory Mitigation Site Protection Instrument Handbook for the Corps Regulatory Program” to provide a reference resource for Corps district regulatory staff involved with ensuring that mitigation projects are protected.   Under the 2008 Corps-EPA Mitigation Rule (33 CFR 332/40 CFR part 230 Subpart J) all compensatory mitigation plans required for Department of the Army (DA) permits must have/address 12 fundamental elements.   One of these elements is a “site protection instrument” to ensure long-term protection of the compensatory mitigation site.  The site protection instrument must protect the aquatic habitats (including wetland and streams), riparian areas, buffers, and uplands that make up the compensatory mitigation project. Site protection must be provided through real estate instruments or other available mechanisms, as appropriate.
New Handbook on Compensatory Mitigation Site Protection
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) has just released a new handbook entitled “Compensatory Mitigation Site Protection Instrument Handbook for the Corps Regulatory Program” to provide a reference resource for Corps district regulatory staff involved with ensuring that mitigation projects are protected. Under the 2008 Corps-EPA Mitigation Rule (33 CFR 332/40 CFR part 230 Subpart J) all compensatory mitigation plans required for Department of the Army (DA) permits must have/address 12 fundamental elements. One of these elements is a “site protection instrument” to ensure long-term protection of the compensatory mitigation site. The site protection instrument must protect the aquatic habitats (including wetland and streams), riparian areas, buffers, and uplands that make up the compensatory mitigation project. Site protection must be provided through real estate instruments or other available mechanisms, as appropriate.

Inside the Institute


PIANC USA Silver Jackets Responses to Climate Change
Flood Risk Management Program Corps Risk Analysis Gateway Shared Vision Planning
Water Resources Training<br />and Education International Center for<br />Integrated Water Resources Management National Shoreline Management Study
Inland Waterways Users Board National Economic Development Manuals Navigation Economics<br />Technologies Program
Sustainable Rivers Project Value to the Nation Port and Inland Waterways Modernization Strategy


Latest Stories

Shared Vision Planning to Reduce Urban Flood Risk in Thailand

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Fueled by increasing economic linkages to China, Lao PDR, and Vietnam, Udon
Published: 11/30/2016

iRAIN: New Mobile App Supports Water Management Around the World

MARRAKECH, MOROCCO.   The public roll-out of the new mobile App iRAIN took place during the United
Published: 11/28/2016

Playing for Keeps: Using Game Theory to Address Flooding and Drought in the Cedar River Basin

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Last month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Rock Island District, Institute
Published: 11/21/2016

Dr. Delli Priscoli’s Legacy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   On July 13, 2016, colleagues and friends gathered in honor of Dr. Jerome
Published: 10/28/2016

USACE Computer Model Critical to the Corps Hurricane Matthew Response

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  To help support the mission and aid in better decision-making, the USACE’s
Published: 10/11/2016

Introducing Shared Vision Planning to the Dominican Republic

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  This summer a team from the USACE’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR)
Published: 10/4/2016

Mekong River Commission and Taiwan Water Resources Agency Officials Visit IWR

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  Representatives from the Mekong River Commission (MeRC) and Taiwan Water
Published: 9/2/2016

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