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On behalf of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) collaborated with the Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF) and the Maldives Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) atlas for Laamu Atoll in the Republic of Maldives. ESI maps provide a concise summary of coastal resources that are at risk if an oil spill occurs. Examples of at-risk resources include biological resources, such as birds and fish; sensitive shorelines, such as marshes and tidal flats; and human-use resources, such as subsistence gathering or fish processing.  According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ESI maps can help responders meet one of the main response objectives: reducing the environmental consequences of the spill and the cleanup efforts. Additionally, ESI maps can be used by planners—before a spill happens—to identify vulnerable locations, establish protection priorities, and identify cleanup strategies.

The MNDF Vice Chief of Defense Force, Brig. Gen. Ahmed Shahid, said, “The Maldives National Defence Force is profoundly grateful to the U.S. Pacific Command for conducting the ESI Project in Laamu Atoll.” “The successful completion of the project provided the MNDF with vital information and resources that will greatly assist in shaping the response to an oil spill or any other natural disaster in the Laamu Atoll region.”
U.S. and Republic of Maldives Governments Collaborate to Protect Unique Ecosystem
On behalf of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) collaborated with the Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF) and the Maldives Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) atlas for Laamu Atoll in the Republic of Maldives. ESI maps provide a concise summary of coastal resources that are at risk if an oil spill occurs. Examples of at-risk resources include biological resources, such as birds and fish; sensitive shorelines, such as marshes and tidal flats; and human-use resources, such as subsistence gathering or fish processing. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ESI maps can help responders meet one of the main response objectives: reducing the environmental consequences of the spill and the cleanup efforts. Additionally, ESI maps can be used by planners—before a spill happens—to identify vulnerable locations, establish protection priorities, and identify cleanup strategies. The MNDF Vice Chief of Defense Force, Brig. Gen. Ahmed Shahid, said, “The Maldives National Defence Force is profoundly grateful to the U.S. Pacific Command for conducting the ESI Project in Laamu Atoll.” “The successful completion of the project provided the MNDF with vital information and resources that will greatly assist in shaping the response to an oil spill or any other natural disaster in the Laamu Atoll region.”
Alexandria, Va.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) increased its use of third-party Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (ECCR) in 2015, reporting 29 specific uses as well as a significant number of non-third-party collaborative efforts across all USACE divisions and mission areas.  
This was a significant increase from the 15 uses reported in 2013 and 2014.  The volume and breadth of non-third-party collaborative efforts were also significant with many efforts noted in both the Navigation and Regulatory business lines.  Interesting to note were the six priority, or emerging, areas of conflict and cross-cutting challenges in USACE:  Water Security, Statutory Requirements and Federal Law, Native American Cultural Sites, Climate Change, National Historic Preservation Act, and In-stream Flows.
USACE Doubles Its Use of Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution Measures
Alexandria, Va. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) increased its use of third-party Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (ECCR) in 2015, reporting 29 specific uses as well as a significant number of non-third-party collaborative efforts across all USACE divisions and mission areas. This was a significant increase from the 15 uses reported in 2013 and 2014. The volume and breadth of non-third-party collaborative efforts were also significant with many efforts noted in both the Navigation and Regulatory business lines. Interesting to note were the six priority, or emerging, areas of conflict and cross-cutting challenges in USACE: Water Security, Statutory Requirements and Federal Law, Native American Cultural Sites, Climate Change, National Historic Preservation Act, and In-stream Flows.
In South East Idaho, community members are working hard with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Walla Walla District (NWW) and the City of Pocatello to develop a guiding vision for the Portneuf River, a river channelized by USACE after a devastating 1962 flood that damaged much of Pocatello and the surrounding valley. The visioning effort will help the community integrate existing policies, plans, and new ideas into a document that will outline goals and objectives for improved river corridor management and identify environmental improvement opportunities.  USACE’s Collaboration and Public Participation Center of Expertise (CPCX) is leading the way in this collaborative effort which brings together a diverse stakeholder working group in developing a plan to revitalize four distinct reaches of the river from an area south of town called “the gap” through Pocatello and northward towards Fort Hall Indian Reservation.  In the process Pocatello residents are being challenged to reimagine their river and their community.

Previous public engagement efforts by the City and by Idaho State University revealed that the concrete flood-control channel and earthen levees upstream of the channel will be the key challenge to creating a new vision for the river corridor. The channel has been a source of contention since its construction by USACE.  It is considered an eyesore for many in the community despite its flood risk management (FRM) benefits.  The majority of stakeholders who have engaged in this process want to see the concrete removed or the channel significantly modified, in order to provide river access, recreation, opportunities for economic revitalization, and to improve water quality and habitat. New studies have also challenged the need for the high level of flood protection the channel provides, which is significantly more than the flood of record.
Portneuf River: Painting a Picture through Community Visioning Workshops
In South East Idaho, community members are working hard with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Walla Walla District (NWW) and the City of Pocatello to develop a guiding vision for the Portneuf River, a river channelized by USACE after a devastating 1962 flood that damaged much of Pocatello and the surrounding valley. The visioning effort will help the community integrate existing policies, plans, and new ideas into a document that will outline goals and objectives for improved river corridor management and identify environmental improvement opportunities. USACE’s Collaboration and Public Participation Center of Expertise (CPCX) is leading the way in this collaborative effort which brings together a diverse stakeholder working group in developing a plan to revitalize four distinct reaches of the river from an area south of town called “the gap” through Pocatello and northward towards Fort Hall Indian Reservation. In the process Pocatello residents are being challenged to reimagine their river and their community. Previous public engagement efforts by the City and by Idaho State University revealed that the concrete flood-control channel and earthen levees upstream of the channel will be the key challenge to creating a new vision for the river corridor. The channel has been a source of contention since its construction by USACE. It is considered an eyesore for many in the community despite its flood risk management (FRM) benefits. The majority of stakeholders who have engaged in this process want to see the concrete removed or the channel significantly modified, in order to provide river access, recreation, opportunities for economic revitalization, and to improve water quality and habitat. New studies have also challenged the need for the high level of flood protection the channel provides, which is significantly more than the flood of record.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   February 2016. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) published the document “Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers,” authored by Dr. Dick Cole, environmental scientist, USACE.

In 1996, Congress authorized the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to improve environmental quality (EQ), as first defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), using aquatic ecosystem restoration and protection measures. The program grew rapidly before recently leveling off.  Despite demonstrable restoration needs, many forces may limit future success.  This study assessed the trends and trend-shaping forces potentially affecting the success of the Corps aquatic ecosystem restoration program over the next three decades, as indicated by program objective achievement. The trends and forces document profound degradation and restoration needs as well as impediments to restoration success.
USACE release Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. February 2016. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) published the document “Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers,” authored by Dr. Dick Cole, environmental scientist, USACE. In 1996, Congress authorized the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to improve environmental quality (EQ), as first defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), using aquatic ecosystem restoration and protection measures. The program grew rapidly before recently leveling off. Despite demonstrable restoration needs, many forces may limit future success. This study assessed the trends and trend-shaping forces potentially affecting the success of the Corps aquatic ecosystem restoration program over the next three decades, as indicated by program objective achievement. The trends and forces document profound degradation and restoration needs as well as impediments to restoration success.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  Mountain snowpack is an important contributor to runoff in the Upper Missouri River Basin; for example, high amounts of winter and spring precipitation in the mountains and plains in 2010–2011 were associated with the peak runoff of record in the Upper Missouri River Basin. 
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completed a pilot research study in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Weather Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, and South Dakota State University to help assess if mountain snowpack and runoff was changing because of changes in climate. USACE worked with USGS to complete a follow-up study.
USACE and USGS release a new study on mountain snowpack
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Mountain snowpack is an important contributor to runoff in the Upper Missouri River Basin; for example, high amounts of winter and spring precipitation in the mountains and plains in 2010–2011 were associated with the peak runoff of record in the Upper Missouri River Basin. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completed a pilot research study in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Weather Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, and South Dakota State University to help assess if mountain snowpack and runoff was changing because of changes in climate. USACE worked with USGS to complete a follow-up study.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   In November 2015, the Institute for Water Resources’ (IWR) staff Michelle Haynes and Hal Cardwell supported, organized and led multiple stakeholder and public meetings as part of POH's Shared Vision Planning approach to the USACE-State of Hawaii West Maui ‎Watershed Plan. The watershed study is supported by a state-federal interagency team who coordinates funded activities relevant to coral reef and watershed health in West Maui.   The study is also supported by a local stakeholder working group, state officials, elders from the communities, private landowners, and others.
‎The team from IWR conducted individual meetings on the plan with the largest landowner in the study area, Maui Land and Pineapple, as well as with the County of Maui, in order to relay study progress.  One new item of note included the recent USACE-supported sediment transport survey work in the basin.
Shared Vision Planning Approach to West Maui Watershed Plan
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. In November 2015, the Institute for Water Resources’ (IWR) staff Michelle Haynes and Hal Cardwell supported, organized and led multiple stakeholder and public meetings as part of POH's Shared Vision Planning approach to the USACE-State of Hawaii West Maui ‎Watershed Plan. The watershed study is supported by a state-federal interagency team who coordinates funded activities relevant to coral reef and watershed health in West Maui. The study is also supported by a local stakeholder working group, state officials, elders from the communities, private landowners, and others. ‎The team from IWR conducted individual meetings on the plan with the largest landowner in the study area, Maui Land and Pineapple, as well as with the County of Maui, in order to relay study progress. One new item of note included the recent USACE-supported sediment transport survey work in the basin.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   In late 2015, Dutch Rijkswaterstaat employee and PIANC member Mr. Arjan Hijdra, switched agencies temporarily when he came to the United States for four weeks at the Institute for Water Resources of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The purpose of his visit was to collect and share knowledge in the field of Performance Management. In other words, how to maximize the performance of waterways using the least resources. Just like Rijkswaterstaat, the USACE continually tries to optimize the performance of the waterways. Key questions included ‘how to ensure minimum service levels are achieved’ and ‘how maximized societal value can be realized.’ Both organizations have limited resources to meet these goals, so everything revolves around smart choices.
USACE’s Value to the Nation At Rijkswaterstaat this optimization process is called 'Performance Management,' and is a task of the institute of Water, Traffic and Environment. Currently the system of Performance Management is being improved and expanded. The US Army Corps of Engineers is working on similar issues. Their efforts of continuously steering and improving performance fall under the umbrella name of 'Value to the Nation’.  One of the major differences, Mr. Hijdra noticed, was that Rijkswaterstaat works with a tight rein on solid performance levels where the USACE focuses on a mix of measures in order to contribute maximally to the socio-economic and political needs. Where Rijkswaterstaat reports on whether agreed performance levels are achieved or not, in the American context the achievements are, where possible, monetized. The average economic value over the past years was $110 billion (Value to the Nation, National Fast Facts 2010-2013). However, yearly spending is restricted roughly to $8 billion dollars per year. Not a bad achievement at all!
Exchange of Waterways Performance Optimization Information: Visiting Dutch Rijkswaterstaat Scholar
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. In late 2015, Dutch Rijkswaterstaat employee and PIANC member Mr. Arjan Hijdra, switched agencies temporarily when he came to the United States for four weeks at the Institute for Water Resources of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The purpose of his visit was to collect and share knowledge in the field of Performance Management. In other words, how to maximize the performance of waterways using the least resources. Just like Rijkswaterstaat, the USACE continually tries to optimize the performance of the waterways. Key questions included ‘how to ensure minimum service levels are achieved’ and ‘how maximized societal value can be realized.’ Both organizations have limited resources to meet these goals, so everything revolves around smart choices. USACE’s Value to the Nation At Rijkswaterstaat this optimization process is called 'Performance Management,' and is a task of the institute of Water, Traffic and Environment. Currently the system of Performance Management is being improved and expanded. The US Army Corps of Engineers is working on similar issues. Their efforts of continuously steering and improving performance fall under the umbrella name of 'Value to the Nation’. One of the major differences, Mr. Hijdra noticed, was that Rijkswaterstaat works with a tight rein on solid performance levels where the USACE focuses on a mix of measures in order to contribute maximally to the socio-economic and political needs. Where Rijkswaterstaat reports on whether agreed performance levels are achieved or not, in the American context the achievements are, where possible, monetized. The average economic value over the past years was $110 billion (Value to the Nation, National Fast Facts 2010-2013). However, yearly spending is restricted roughly to $8 billion dollars per year. Not a bad achievement at all!
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. It is with great respect that the US Section PIANC honors Commissioner Dr. Robert “Bob” Engler who passed away in March of this year, by announcing the Robert M. Engler, Ph.D. Student Travel Scholarship.  During the recent Dredging 2015 Conference in Savannah, The Honorable Jo-Ellen Darcy, Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works), provided a moving tribute to Bob during which she made the announcement.  The scholarship will enable PIANC USA to provide travel funding to full time students to attend its technical conferences.  Dr. Engler was always extremely supportive of and mentoring to students and Young Professionals (YPs), making this the perfect tribute to keep his memory strong.  Generations will continue to look to him for inspiration.  Bob’s wife Pat took the stage to accept the plaque commemorating the Scholarship.  She was accompanied to the event by her daughter Jimi Bonnette, son Rip Engler, and sister Jimmi Vasser.
ROBERT M. ENGLER, Ph.D. STUDENT TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP Announced at the Dredging 2015 Conference
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. It is with great respect that the US Section PIANC honors Commissioner Dr. Robert “Bob” Engler who passed away in March of this year, by announcing the Robert M. Engler, Ph.D. Student Travel Scholarship. During the recent Dredging 2015 Conference in Savannah, The Honorable Jo-Ellen Darcy, Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works), provided a moving tribute to Bob during which she made the announcement. The scholarship will enable PIANC USA to provide travel funding to full time students to attend its technical conferences. Dr. Engler was always extremely supportive of and mentoring to students and Young Professionals (YPs), making this the perfect tribute to keep his memory strong. Generations will continue to look to him for inspiration. Bob’s wife Pat took the stage to accept the plaque commemorating the Scholarship. She was accompanied to the event by her daughter Jimi Bonnette, son Rip Engler, and sister Jimmi Vasser.

Inside the Institute

PIANC USA Silver Jackets Responses to Climate Change
Flood Risk Management Program Corps Risk Analysis Gateway Shared Vision Planning
Water Resources Training
            and Education International Center for
            Integrated Water Resources Management National Shoreline Management Study
Inland Waterways Users Board National Economic Development Manuals Navigation Economics
            Technologies Program
Sustainable Rivers Project Value to the Nation Port and Inland Waterways Modernization Strategy

Latest Stories

U.S. and Republic of Maldives Governments Collaborate to Protect Unique Ecosystem

On behalf of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) collaborated with the Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF) and the Maldives Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) atlas for Laamu Atoll in the Republic of Maldives. ESI maps provide a concise summary of coastal resources that are at risk if an oil spill occurs. Examples of at-risk resources include biological resources, such as birds and fish; sensitive shorelines, such as marshes and tidal flats; and human-use resources, such as subsistence gathering or fish processing. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ESI maps can help responders meet one of the main response objectives: reducing the environmental consequences of the spill and the cleanup efforts. Additionally, ESI maps can be used by planners—before a spill happens—to identify vulnerable locations, establish protection priorities, and identify cleanup strategies.
Published: 4/26/2016

USACE Doubles Its Use of Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution Measures

Alexandria, Va. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) increased its use of third-party Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (ECCR) in 2015, reporting 29 specific uses as well as a significant number of non-third-party collaborative efforts across all USACE divisions and mission areas. This was a significant increase from the 15 uses reported in 2013 and 2014. The volume and breadth of non-third-party collaborative efforts were also significant with many efforts noted in both the Navigation and Regulatory business lines. Interesting to note were the six priority, or emerging, areas of conflict and cross-cutting challenges in USACE: Water Security, Statutory Requirements and Federal Law, Native American Cultural Sites, Climate Change, National Historic Preservation Act, and In-stream Flows.
Published: 4/21/2016

Portneuf River: Painting a Picture through Community Visioning Workshops

In South East Idaho, community members are working hard with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Walla Walla District (NWW) and the City of Pocatello to develop a guiding vision for the Portneuf River, a river channelized by USACE after a devastating 1962 flood that damaged much of Pocatello and the surrounding valley. The visioning effort will help the community integrate existing policies, plans, and new ideas into a document that will outline goals and objectives for improved river corridor management and identify environmental improvement opportunities. USACE’s Collaboration and Public Participation Center of Expertise (CPCX) is leading the way in this collaborative effort which brings together a diverse stakeholder working group in developing a plan to revitalize four distinct reaches of the river from an area south of town called “the gap” through Pocatello and northward towards Fort Hall Indian Reservation. In the process Pocatello residents are being challenged to reimagine their river and their community.
Published: 4/19/2016

USACE release Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   February 2016. The Institute for WaterResources (IWR) published the document
Published: 3/18/2016

USACE and USGS release a new study on mountain snowpack

ALEXANDRIA,VIRGINIA.  Mountain snowpack is animportant contributor to runoff in the Upper Missouri
Published: 3/1/2016

Shared Vision Planning Approach to West Maui Watershed Plan

ALEXANDRIA,VIRGINIA.   In November 2015, the Institute for WaterResources’ (IWR) staff Michelle
Published: 1/29/2016

Exchange of Waterways Performance Optimization Information: Visiting Dutch Rijkswaterstaat Scholar

ALEXANDRIA,VIRGINIA.   In late 2015, Dutch Rijkswaterstaatemployee and PIANC member Mr. Arjan
Published: 1/29/2016

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