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BEIJING, CHINA - May 19, 2016. IWR and ICIWaRM Director Bob Pietrowsky represented USACE and the USG at the inaugural global meeting of the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO’s) Category I and II Water and Science Centers, held in Beijing, China, 15-18 May 2016. 

The event marked the first time UNESCO’s Category I & II Water and Science Centers came together to coordinate their programs and work together towards increasing their collaboration in support of UNESCO’s efforts to address the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals focusing on the dual objectives of Poverty Reduction and Sustainable Development. Category II Centers, which function under the auspices of UNESCO but are not legally part of the Organization, are entirely staffed and funded by each host nation. They are playing an increasingly important role in carrying our UNESCO’s programs, particularly in science and water resources, currently with 65 Category II Centers, of which over half are focused on freshwater as part of UNESCO’s “Water Family” in support of the International Hydrological Program (IHP).
IWR ICIWaRM Director Attends Inaugural Global Meeting of UNESCO Water and Science Centers
BEIJING, CHINA - May 19, 2016. IWR and ICIWaRM Director Bob Pietrowsky represented USACE and the USG at the inaugural global meeting of the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO’s) Category I and II Water and Science Centers, held in Beijing, China, 15-18 May 2016. The event marked the first time UNESCO’s Category I & II Water and Science Centers came together to coordinate their programs and work together towards increasing their collaboration in support of UNESCO’s efforts to address the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals focusing on the dual objectives of Poverty Reduction and Sustainable Development. Category II Centers, which function under the auspices of UNESCO but are not legally part of the Organization, are entirely staffed and funded by each host nation. They are playing an increasingly important role in carrying our UNESCO’s programs, particularly in science and water resources, currently with 65 Category II Centers, of which over half are focused on freshwater as part of UNESCO’s “Water Family” in support of the International Hydrological Program (IHP).
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINA.   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) multi-purpose reservoir projects manage the risks of flooding, ensure reliable supplies of water for public health and economic production, generate clean and affordable electricity, provide safe and enriching opportunities for water-based recreation to the public, and maintain adequate levels of streamflow to support navigation and commerce on the inland waterways, aquatic and wildlife habitat, and water quality.  Many of the Corps dam and reservoir projects have passed the end of their original 50-year planning lives and are entering a life-cycle phase of long-term maintenance and modification.  In 2008, the Corps began the National Portfolio program with a survey and assessment of the reservoir project portfolio in support of its overall strategic goal of managing the life-cycle of water resources infrastructure systems in order to consistently deliver sustainable services.  This report presents major findings of the survey, discusses considerations and case studies related to project modifications, as well as ongoing work and next steps to better understand the status and challenges in continuing to operate and maintain these complex and dynamic projects to best serve the evolving needs of today and future generations.
USACE Releases 2016-RES-01 – Status and Challenges for USACE Reservoirs: A Product of the National Portfolio Assessment for Water Supply Reallocations
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINA. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) multi-purpose reservoir projects manage the risks of flooding, ensure reliable supplies of water for public health and economic production, generate clean and affordable electricity, provide safe and enriching opportunities for water-based recreation to the public, and maintain adequate levels of streamflow to support navigation and commerce on the inland waterways, aquatic and wildlife habitat, and water quality. Many of the Corps dam and reservoir projects have passed the end of their original 50-year planning lives and are entering a life-cycle phase of long-term maintenance and modification. In 2008, the Corps began the National Portfolio program with a survey and assessment of the reservoir project portfolio in support of its overall strategic goal of managing the life-cycle of water resources infrastructure systems in order to consistently deliver sustainable services. This report presents major findings of the survey, discusses considerations and case studies related to project modifications, as well as ongoing work and next steps to better understand the status and challenges in continuing to operate and maintain these complex and dynamic projects to best serve the evolving needs of today and future generations.
Raising Flood Risk Awareness through Interactive Media
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Flood Risk Management Program (FRMP) works across the agency to focus on the policies, programs and expertise of the USACE toward reducing overall flood risk. According to a survey by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in 2013, approximately forty percent of homeowners in America do not know their home’s flood risk category. How can the USACE conduct outreach to this population? To address this question, there is growing interest in utilizing interactive media to communicate flood risk through "gamification."  Gamification is the application of game playing elements to other activities, thereby encouraging new ways of interacting with a product or service. This can include virtual reality, augmented reality, and other digital media implemented as an outreach tool for raising public awareness of flood risk, especially for younger audiences. Augmented reality is a technology that superimposes a computer-generated image on a user’s view of the real world providing a composite view.
Two Silver Jackets' Interagency Flood Risk Management Program projects that are partially funded by the USACE are making use of gamification to communicate such risk and are currently in development. The California QR Code Project is utilizing "quick response" codes linked to an ESRI Story Map to educate the public on flood risk within California such as in their "Understanding Floods in California" story map. The Nevada Multimedia Continuation takes it a step further with the goal to develop video gaming features that promote critical thinking in water management to educate Nevada residents, especially youth, to be more aware of their flood risk. Hunter Merritt, the USACE technical lead for both projects explains, "Look around. We see young people gaming or consuming digital media every day. We should be reaching them where they spend their time. If the co
Raising Flood Risk Awareness through Interactive Media
Raising Flood Risk Awareness through Interactive Media ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Flood Risk Management Program (FRMP) works across the agency to focus on the policies, programs and expertise of the USACE toward reducing overall flood risk. According to a survey by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in 2013, approximately forty percent of homeowners in America do not know their home’s flood risk category. How can the USACE conduct outreach to this population? To address this question, there is growing interest in utilizing interactive media to communicate flood risk through "gamification." Gamification is the application of game playing elements to other activities, thereby encouraging new ways of interacting with a product or service. This can include virtual reality, augmented reality, and other digital media implemented as an outreach tool for raising public awareness of flood risk, especially for younger audiences. Augmented reality is a technology that superimposes a computer-generated image on a user’s view of the real world providing a composite view. Two Silver Jackets' Interagency Flood Risk Management Program projects that are partially funded by the USACE are making use of gamification to communicate such risk and are currently in development. The California QR Code Project is utilizing "quick response" codes linked to an ESRI Story Map to educate the public on flood risk within California such as in their "Understanding Floods in California" story map. The Nevada Multimedia Continuation takes it a step further with the goal to develop video gaming features that promote critical thinking in water management to educate Nevada residents, especially youth, to be more aware of their flood risk. Hunter Merritt, the USACE technical lead for both projects explains, "Look around. We see young people gaming or consuming digital media every day. We should be reaching them where they spend their time. If the co
On behalf of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) collaborated with the Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF) and the Maldives Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) atlas for Laamu Atoll in the Republic of Maldives. ESI maps provide a concise summary of coastal resources that are at risk if an oil spill occurs. Examples of at-risk resources include biological resources, such as birds and fish; sensitive shorelines, such as marshes and tidal flats; and human-use resources, such as subsistence gathering or fish processing.  According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ESI maps can help responders meet one of the main response objectives: reducing the environmental consequences of the spill and the cleanup efforts. Additionally, ESI maps can be used by planners—before a spill happens—to identify vulnerable locations, establish protection priorities, and identify cleanup strategies.

The MNDF Vice Chief of Defense Force, Brig. Gen. Ahmed Shahid, said, “The Maldives National Defence Force is profoundly grateful to the U.S. Pacific Command for conducting the ESI Project in Laamu Atoll.” “The successful completion of the project provided the MNDF with vital information and resources that will greatly assist in shaping the response to an oil spill or any other natural disaster in the Laamu Atoll region.”
U.S. and Republic of Maldives Governments Collaborate to Protect Unique Ecosystem
On behalf of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) collaborated with the Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF) and the Maldives Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) atlas for Laamu Atoll in the Republic of Maldives. ESI maps provide a concise summary of coastal resources that are at risk if an oil spill occurs. Examples of at-risk resources include biological resources, such as birds and fish; sensitive shorelines, such as marshes and tidal flats; and human-use resources, such as subsistence gathering or fish processing. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ESI maps can help responders meet one of the main response objectives: reducing the environmental consequences of the spill and the cleanup efforts. Additionally, ESI maps can be used by planners—before a spill happens—to identify vulnerable locations, establish protection priorities, and identify cleanup strategies. The MNDF Vice Chief of Defense Force, Brig. Gen. Ahmed Shahid, said, “The Maldives National Defence Force is profoundly grateful to the U.S. Pacific Command for conducting the ESI Project in Laamu Atoll.” “The successful completion of the project provided the MNDF with vital information and resources that will greatly assist in shaping the response to an oil spill or any other natural disaster in the Laamu Atoll region.”
Alexandria, Va.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) increased its use of third-party Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (ECCR) in 2015, reporting 29 specific uses as well as a significant number of non-third-party collaborative efforts across all USACE divisions and mission areas.  
This was a significant increase from the 15 uses reported in 2013 and 2014.  The volume and breadth of non-third-party collaborative efforts were also significant with many efforts noted in both the Navigation and Regulatory business lines.  Interesting to note were the six priority, or emerging, areas of conflict and cross-cutting challenges in USACE:  Water Security, Statutory Requirements and Federal Law, Native American Cultural Sites, Climate Change, National Historic Preservation Act, and In-stream Flows.
USACE Doubles Its Use of Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution Measures
Alexandria, Va. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) increased its use of third-party Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (ECCR) in 2015, reporting 29 specific uses as well as a significant number of non-third-party collaborative efforts across all USACE divisions and mission areas. This was a significant increase from the 15 uses reported in 2013 and 2014. The volume and breadth of non-third-party collaborative efforts were also significant with many efforts noted in both the Navigation and Regulatory business lines. Interesting to note were the six priority, or emerging, areas of conflict and cross-cutting challenges in USACE: Water Security, Statutory Requirements and Federal Law, Native American Cultural Sites, Climate Change, National Historic Preservation Act, and In-stream Flows.
In South East Idaho, community members are working hard with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Walla Walla District (NWW) and the City of Pocatello to develop a guiding vision for the Portneuf River, a river channelized by USACE after a devastating 1962 flood that damaged much of Pocatello and the surrounding valley. The visioning effort will help the community integrate existing policies, plans, and new ideas into a document that will outline goals and objectives for improved river corridor management and identify environmental improvement opportunities.  USACE’s Collaboration and Public Participation Center of Expertise (CPCX) is leading the way in this collaborative effort which brings together a diverse stakeholder working group in developing a plan to revitalize four distinct reaches of the river from an area south of town called “the gap” through Pocatello and northward towards Fort Hall Indian Reservation.  In the process Pocatello residents are being challenged to reimagine their river and their community.

Previous public engagement efforts by the City and by Idaho State University revealed that the concrete flood-control channel and earthen levees upstream of the channel will be the key challenge to creating a new vision for the river corridor. The channel has been a source of contention since its construction by USACE.  It is considered an eyesore for many in the community despite its flood risk management (FRM) benefits.  The majority of stakeholders who have engaged in this process want to see the concrete removed or the channel significantly modified, in order to provide river access, recreation, opportunities for economic revitalization, and to improve water quality and habitat. New studies have also challenged the need for the high level of flood protection the channel provides, which is significantly more than the flood of record.
Portneuf River: Painting a Picture through Community Visioning Workshops
In South East Idaho, community members are working hard with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Walla Walla District (NWW) and the City of Pocatello to develop a guiding vision for the Portneuf River, a river channelized by USACE after a devastating 1962 flood that damaged much of Pocatello and the surrounding valley. The visioning effort will help the community integrate existing policies, plans, and new ideas into a document that will outline goals and objectives for improved river corridor management and identify environmental improvement opportunities. USACE’s Collaboration and Public Participation Center of Expertise (CPCX) is leading the way in this collaborative effort which brings together a diverse stakeholder working group in developing a plan to revitalize four distinct reaches of the river from an area south of town called “the gap” through Pocatello and northward towards Fort Hall Indian Reservation. In the process Pocatello residents are being challenged to reimagine their river and their community. Previous public engagement efforts by the City and by Idaho State University revealed that the concrete flood-control channel and earthen levees upstream of the channel will be the key challenge to creating a new vision for the river corridor. The channel has been a source of contention since its construction by USACE. It is considered an eyesore for many in the community despite its flood risk management (FRM) benefits. The majority of stakeholders who have engaged in this process want to see the concrete removed or the channel significantly modified, in order to provide river access, recreation, opportunities for economic revitalization, and to improve water quality and habitat. New studies have also challenged the need for the high level of flood protection the channel provides, which is significantly more than the flood of record.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   February 2016. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) published the document “Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers,” authored by Dr. Dick Cole, environmental scientist, USACE.

In 1996, Congress authorized the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to improve environmental quality (EQ), as first defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), using aquatic ecosystem restoration and protection measures. The program grew rapidly before recently leveling off.  Despite demonstrable restoration needs, many forces may limit future success.  This study assessed the trends and trend-shaping forces potentially affecting the success of the Corps aquatic ecosystem restoration program over the next three decades, as indicated by program objective achievement. The trends and forces document profound degradation and restoration needs as well as impediments to restoration success.
USACE release Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. February 2016. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) published the document “Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers,” authored by Dr. Dick Cole, environmental scientist, USACE. In 1996, Congress authorized the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to improve environmental quality (EQ), as first defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), using aquatic ecosystem restoration and protection measures. The program grew rapidly before recently leveling off. Despite demonstrable restoration needs, many forces may limit future success. This study assessed the trends and trend-shaping forces potentially affecting the success of the Corps aquatic ecosystem restoration program over the next three decades, as indicated by program objective achievement. The trends and forces document profound degradation and restoration needs as well as impediments to restoration success.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  Mountain snowpack is an important contributor to runoff in the Upper Missouri River Basin; for example, high amounts of winter and spring precipitation in the mountains and plains in 2010–2011 were associated with the peak runoff of record in the Upper Missouri River Basin. 
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completed a pilot research study in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Weather Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, and South Dakota State University to help assess if mountain snowpack and runoff was changing because of changes in climate. USACE worked with USGS to complete a follow-up study.
USACE and USGS release a new study on mountain snowpack
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Mountain snowpack is an important contributor to runoff in the Upper Missouri River Basin; for example, high amounts of winter and spring precipitation in the mountains and plains in 2010–2011 were associated with the peak runoff of record in the Upper Missouri River Basin. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completed a pilot research study in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Weather Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, and South Dakota State University to help assess if mountain snowpack and runoff was changing because of changes in climate. USACE worked with USGS to complete a follow-up study.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   In November 2015, the Institute for Water Resources’ (IWR) staff Michelle Haynes and Hal Cardwell supported, organized and led multiple stakeholder and public meetings as part of POH's Shared Vision Planning approach to the USACE-State of Hawaii West Maui ‎Watershed Plan. The watershed study is supported by a state-federal interagency team who coordinates funded activities relevant to coral reef and watershed health in West Maui.   The study is also supported by a local stakeholder working group, state officials, elders from the communities, private landowners, and others.
‎The team from IWR conducted individual meetings on the plan with the largest landowner in the study area, Maui Land and Pineapple, as well as with the County of Maui, in order to relay study progress.  One new item of note included the recent USACE-supported sediment transport survey work in the basin.
Shared Vision Planning Approach to West Maui Watershed Plan
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. In November 2015, the Institute for Water Resources’ (IWR) staff Michelle Haynes and Hal Cardwell supported, organized and led multiple stakeholder and public meetings as part of POH's Shared Vision Planning approach to the USACE-State of Hawaii West Maui ‎Watershed Plan. The watershed study is supported by a state-federal interagency team who coordinates funded activities relevant to coral reef and watershed health in West Maui. The study is also supported by a local stakeholder working group, state officials, elders from the communities, private landowners, and others. ‎The team from IWR conducted individual meetings on the plan with the largest landowner in the study area, Maui Land and Pineapple, as well as with the County of Maui, in order to relay study progress. One new item of note included the recent USACE-supported sediment transport survey work in the basin.

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PIANC USA Silver Jackets Responses to Climate Change
Flood Risk Management Program Corps Risk Analysis Gateway Shared Vision Planning
Water Resources Training
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Inland Waterways Users Board National Economic Development Manuals Navigation Economics
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Sustainable Rivers Project Value to the Nation Port and Inland Waterways Modernization Strategy

Latest Stories

IWR ICIWaRM Director Attends Inaugural Global Meeting of UNESCO Water and Science Centers

BEIJING, CHINA - May 19, 2016. IWR and ICIWaRM Director Bob Pietrowsky represented USACE and the USG at the inaugural global meeting of the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO’s) Category I and II Water and Science Centers, held in Beijing, China, 15-18 May 2016. The event marked the first time UNESCO’s Category I & II Water and Science Centers came together to coordinate their programs and work together towards increasing their collaboration in support of UNESCO’s efforts to address the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals focusing on the dual objectives of Poverty Reduction and Sustainable Development. Category II Centers, which function under the auspices of UNESCO but are not legally part of the Organization, are entirely staffed and funded by each host nation. They are playing an increasingly important role in carrying our UNESCO’s programs, particularly in science and water resources, currently with 65 Category II Centers, of which over half are focused on freshwater as part of UNESCO’s “Water Family” in support of the International Hydrological Program (IHP).
Published: 6/7/2016
Published: 5/11/2016

Raising Flood Risk Awareness through Interactive Media

ALEXANDRIA,VIRGINA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Flood Risk Management Program (FRMP)
Published: 5/3/2016

U.S. and Republic of Maldives Governments Collaborate to Protect Unique Ecosystem

On behalf of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) collaborated with the Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF) and the Maldives Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare an Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) atlas for Laamu Atoll in the Republic of Maldives. ESI maps provide a concise summary of coastal resources that are at risk if an oil spill occurs. Examples of at-risk resources include biological resources, such as birds and fish; sensitive shorelines, such as marshes and tidal flats; and human-use resources, such as subsistence gathering or fish processing. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ESI maps can help responders meet one of the main response objectives: reducing the environmental consequences of the spill and the cleanup efforts. Additionally, ESI maps can be used by planners—before a spill happens—to identify vulnerable locations, establish protection priorities, and identify cleanup strategies.
Published: 4/26/2016

USACE Doubles Its Use of Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution Measures

Alexandria, Va. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) increased its use of third-party Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (ECCR) in 2015, reporting 29 specific uses as well as a significant number of non-third-party collaborative efforts across all USACE divisions and mission areas. This was a significant increase from the 15 uses reported in 2013 and 2014. The volume and breadth of non-third-party collaborative efforts were also significant with many efforts noted in both the Navigation and Regulatory business lines. Interesting to note were the six priority, or emerging, areas of conflict and cross-cutting challenges in USACE: Water Security, Statutory Requirements and Federal Law, Native American Cultural Sites, Climate Change, National Historic Preservation Act, and In-stream Flows.
Published: 4/21/2016

Portneuf River: Painting a Picture through Community Visioning Workshops

In South East Idaho, community members are working hard with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Walla Walla District (NWW) and the City of Pocatello to develop a guiding vision for the Portneuf River, a river channelized by USACE after a devastating 1962 flood that damaged much of Pocatello and the surrounding valley. The visioning effort will help the community integrate existing policies, plans, and new ideas into a document that will outline goals and objectives for improved river corridor management and identify environmental improvement opportunities. USACE’s Collaboration and Public Participation Center of Expertise (CPCX) is leading the way in this collaborative effort which brings together a diverse stakeholder working group in developing a plan to revitalize four distinct reaches of the river from an area south of town called “the gap” through Pocatello and northward towards Fort Hall Indian Reservation. In the process Pocatello residents are being challenged to reimagine their river and their community.
Published: 4/19/2016

USACE release Trends and Outlook: The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Program of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   February 2016. The Institute for WaterResources (IWR) published the document
Published: 3/18/2016

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