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ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources recently released a report entitled Estimating USACE Capital Stock, 1928 to 2016.  The report presents the findings of a study to update estimates of the capital stock value of water resources infrastructure built by USACE between 1928 and 2016. This infrastructure consists of many different types of capital such as dams, levees, harbors and waterway improvements, locks, channels, hydroelectric generating works, and recreation facilities. These infrastructure projects provide an annual stream of benefits to the Nation in the form of transportation costs savings, flood damages prevented, electric power production, water supply storage, recreation, and ecosystem restoration that contribute to national economic prosperity; global competitiveness; and the health, safety, and quality of life of our citizens.
New USACE Report - Estimating USACE Capital Stock, 1928 - 2016
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources recently released a report entitled Estimating USACE Capital Stock, 1928 to 2016. The report presents the findings of a study to update estimates of the capital stock value of water resources infrastructure built by USACE between 1928 and 2016. This infrastructure consists of many different types of capital such as dams, levees, harbors and waterway improvements, locks, channels, hydroelectric generating works, and recreation facilities. These infrastructure projects provide an annual stream of benefits to the Nation in the form of transportation costs savings, flood damages prevented, electric power production, water supply storage, recreation, and ecosystem restoration that contribute to national economic prosperity; global competitiveness; and the health, safety, and quality of life of our citizens.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) recently released its “Hawaiian Islands Regional Assessment National Shoreline Management Study” report. This report provides an assessment of the effects of erosion and accretion upon socio-economics and the environment, and what management actions are being taken or are needed to maintain resilient shorelines. 
The National Shoreline Management Study 
The Congressionally authorized National Shoreline Management Study (NSMS) is the first undertaking in nearly a half century to document the physical, economic, environmental, and social impacts of shoreline change across each region of the U.S.  The NSMS provides government policymakers, coastal engineers and scientists, and stakeholders with information about the coastal regions most in need of resilience planning.
USACE Releases Hawaiian Islands Shoreline Management Regional Assessment Report
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) recently released its “Hawaiian Islands Regional Assessment National Shoreline Management Study” report. This report provides an assessment of the effects of erosion and accretion upon socio-economics and the environment, and what management actions are being taken or are needed to maintain resilient shorelines. The National Shoreline Management Study The Congressionally authorized National Shoreline Management Study (NSMS) is the first undertaking in nearly a half century to document the physical, economic, environmental, and social impacts of shoreline change across each region of the U.S. The NSMS provides government policymakers, coastal engineers and scientists, and stakeholders with information about the coastal regions most in need of resilience planning.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) recently released its “California Regional Assessment National Shoreline Management Study” report. This report provides an assessment of the effects of erosion and accretion upon socio-economics and the environment, and what management actions are being taken or are needed to maintain resilient shorelines. 
The National Shoreline Management Study 
The Congressionally authorized National Shoreline Management Study (NSMS) is the first undertaking in nearly a half century to document the physical, economic, environmental, and social impacts of shoreline change across each region of the U.S. The NSMS provides government policymakers, coastal engineers and scientists, and stakeholders with information about the coastal regions most in need of resilience planning.
USACE Releases Shoreline Management Regional Assessment Report for California
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) recently released its “California Regional Assessment National Shoreline Management Study” report. This report provides an assessment of the effects of erosion and accretion upon socio-economics and the environment, and what management actions are being taken or are needed to maintain resilient shorelines. The National Shoreline Management Study The Congressionally authorized National Shoreline Management Study (NSMS) is the first undertaking in nearly a half century to document the physical, economic, environmental, and social impacts of shoreline change across each region of the U.S. The NSMS provides government policymakers, coastal engineers and scientists, and stakeholders with information about the coastal regions most in need of resilience planning.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources, in conjunction with its Rock Island District, recently released a report entitled Cedar Rapids Flood Risk Management: A Case Study in Disaster Recovery.  The report provides an overview and details of post-flood recovery actions in Cedar Rapids, Iowa following devastating flooding of the Cedar River in June 2008.  It also includes observations and lessons regarding U.S. flood risk management drawn from the city’s recovery efforts. 
In June 2008, Cedar Rapids experienced record flooding of the Cedar River.  The river crested at nearly 20 feet above local flood stage and devastated the city's downtown area, thousands of residential properties, and much of the city’s water supply and wastewater treatment infrastructure.  The flood and Cedar Rapids’ losses were national-level news for several weeks.  Total losses were estimated at $5.4 billion and the event was Iowa’s largest natural disaster.
10 “Lessons Learned” From the Cedar Rapids 2008 Flood in New IWR Report
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources, in conjunction with its Rock Island District, recently released a report entitled Cedar Rapids Flood Risk Management: A Case Study in Disaster Recovery. The report provides an overview and details of post-flood recovery actions in Cedar Rapids, Iowa following devastating flooding of the Cedar River in June 2008. It also includes observations and lessons regarding U.S. flood risk management drawn from the city’s recovery efforts. In June 2008, Cedar Rapids experienced record flooding of the Cedar River. The river crested at nearly 20 feet above local flood stage and devastated the city's downtown area, thousands of residential properties, and much of the city’s water supply and wastewater treatment infrastructure. The flood and Cedar Rapids’ losses were national-level news for several weeks. Total losses were estimated at $5.4 billion and the event was Iowa’s largest natural disaster.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources just released a new report, Advances in Conservation Ecology: Paradigm Shifts of Consequence for USACE Environmental Planning, Management and Conservation Cooperation.  This report presents a digest of information on recent advances in ecological science and management for USACE ecologists and eco-managers.
Advances in conservation ecology are changing the way federal agencies in the United States plan, manage and cooperate to achieve their missions. These advances have contributed to major changes in the widely accepted working concepts—or paradigms—that underlie widely held assumptions of ecological management. Many of these paradigm shifts occurred since USACE environmental policy and technical guidance was written and are unevenly understood among ecological managers (eco-managers). 
The concept of ecosystem management emerged in the 1990s as an attractive alternative to species-based management, but, in its earlier incarnations in the 1990s, ecosystem management tended to rely on assumptions of long-term ecological stability and integrity that are now largely dismissed as unrealistic by ecologists and leading eco-managers in large part because of increasing awareness of past and potential climate-change effects.
New IWR Publication on Advances in Conservation Ecology
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources just released a new report, Advances in Conservation Ecology: Paradigm Shifts of Consequence for USACE Environmental Planning, Management and Conservation Cooperation. This report presents a digest of information on recent advances in ecological science and management for USACE ecologists and eco-managers. Advances in conservation ecology are changing the way federal agencies in the United States plan, manage and cooperate to achieve their missions. These advances have contributed to major changes in the widely accepted working concepts—or paradigms—that underlie widely held assumptions of ecological management. Many of these paradigm shifts occurred since USACE environmental policy and technical guidance was written and are unevenly understood among ecological managers (eco-managers). The concept of ecosystem management emerged in the 1990s as an attractive alternative to species-based management, but, in its earlier incarnations in the 1990s, ecosystem management tended to rely on assumptions of long-term ecological stability and integrity that are now largely dismissed as unrealistic by ecologists and leading eco-managers in large part because of increasing awareness of past and potential climate-change effects.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Civil and Mechanical Engineering Cadets from the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) gathered at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Headquarters on July 30 as part of a larger five-day program across the east coast to expose them to the USACE mission.  The cadets were provided an opportunity to learn about the key components of the USACE’s Military and Civil Works Programs.  One of the objectives of the visit was to provide an overview on the wide range of subjects related to executing the USACE mission and serving its customers.  

The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was invited to participate in the Washington D.C. morning session to cover subjects in U.S. Water Resources Development, USACE Planning Activities, and Public Participation and Collaboration.  Dr. Joe Manous, IWR Director, gave an insightful perspective of the Nation’s needs related to water resources and how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has and continues to support those requirements.  His discussion covered water uses, the Federal role, the evolution of environmental policies, and 20th century water resources investments.  The presentations emphasized the importance of economic development as the driving factor in shaping U.S. water resources development since the founding of the United States. This interactive discussion provided the cadets a strategic context from which to view the important work the USACE is doing today.
West Point Cadets Get Acquainted with USACE and IWR’s Unique Capabilities
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Civil and Mechanical Engineering Cadets from the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) gathered at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Headquarters on July 30 as part of a larger five-day program across the east coast to expose them to the USACE mission. The cadets were provided an opportunity to learn about the key components of the USACE’s Military and Civil Works Programs. One of the objectives of the visit was to provide an overview on the wide range of subjects related to executing the USACE mission and serving its customers. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was invited to participate in the Washington D.C. morning session to cover subjects in U.S. Water Resources Development, USACE Planning Activities, and Public Participation and Collaboration. Dr. Joe Manous, IWR Director, gave an insightful perspective of the Nation’s needs related to water resources and how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has and continues to support those requirements. His discussion covered water uses, the Federal role, the evolution of environmental policies, and 20th century water resources investments. The presentations emphasized the importance of economic development as the driving factor in shaping U.S. water resources development since the founding of the United States. This interactive discussion provided the cadets a strategic context from which to view the important work the USACE is doing today.

Inside the Institute


PIANC USA Silver Jackets Responses to Climate Change
Flood Risk Management Program Corps Risk Analysis Gateway Shared Vision Planning
Water Resources Training<br />and Education International Center for<br />Integrated Water Resources Management National Shoreline Management Study
Inland Waterways Users Board National Economic Development Manuals Navigation Economics<br />Technologies Program
Sustainable Rivers Project Value to the Nation Port and Inland Waterways Modernization Strategy
Navigation Economics Technologies (NETS) Shared Vision Planning Water Resources Training National shoreline Management Study Sustainable Rivers Project

Latest Stories

New USACE Report - Estimating USACE Capital Stock, 1928 - 2016

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources
Published: 12/14/2018

USACE Releases Hawaiian Islands Shoreline Management Regional Assessment Report

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR)
Published: 10/31/2018

USACE Releases Shoreline Management Regional Assessment Report for California

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR)
Published: 10/30/2018

10 “Lessons Learned” From the Cedar Rapids 2008 Flood in New IWR Report

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources, in
Published: 9/21/2018

New IWR Publication on Advances in Conservation Ecology

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources just
Published: 9/17/2018

West Point Cadets Get Acquainted with USACE and IWR’s Unique Capabilities

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Civil and Mechanical Engineering Cadets from the U.S. Military Academy (West
Published: 8/16/2018

IWR Participates in USACE – Japan Technical Exchange Meetings

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   The USACE and the Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport, and
Published: 7/31/2018

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