US Army Corps of Engineers
Institute for Water Resources

The Corps' Regional Economic System (RECONS) 2.0 model is a nationally-certified model designed for Regional Economic Development (RED) assessments with unlimited access Corps wide. The 2.0 version of RECONS is an update and enhancement of the previously-certified 1.0 version. Extensive technical and usability reviews of the model were accomplished by a national review team. The model certification process followed the guidance per “Memorandum dated 4 December 2017, Modification of the Model Certification Process and Delegation of Model Approval for Use”, and “Memorandum dated 11 May 2018 Delegation of Model Certification” and reflects version RECONS 2.0. It meets the certification criteria contained in EC 1105-2-412.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) recently released a report entitled Partnering with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: A Guide for Communities, Local Governments, States, Tribes, and Non-Governmental Organizations. This report provides a general introduction to the programs and processes available for non-Federal partners and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) representatives to work together to address the Nation’s water resources problems. It includes an overview of the USACE Civil Works Program and describes how USACE can work with local, State, Tribal, and Federal agencies and other non-Federal partners on activities ranging from technical services and advice to planning and constructing water resources projects. The goal of this publication is to outline the key processes and paths to engagement with USACE. The report provides information for potential partners or anyone who wishes to better understand partnerships with USACE. It also provides details on how to contact USACE to discuss your specific interests, needs, and next steps.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) recently released a report entitled Value to the Nation of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Civil Works Programs: Estimates of National Economic Development (NED) Benefits and Revenues to the U.S. Treasury for 2010-2015. Each year USACE prepares a budget to carry out its water resources mission; this report provides estimates of the value to the nation produced by USACE carrying out that mission. More specifically, the report estimates the value to the nation produced by several USACE Civil Works programs – Flood Risk Management, Navigation, Hydropower, Water Supply and Recreation – for fiscal years 2010 through 2015. The value of these programs is expressed in terms of each program’s contributions to national economic development (NED) benefits and revenues to the U.S. Department of the Treasury (U.S. Treasury). Contributions to NED benefits are increases in the value of the national output of goods and services expressed in monetary units. To generate estimates of net return, the analysis compares NED benefits to the budget for each Civil Works program. Contributions to the U.S. Treasury revenues are the increases in tax payments and direct payments for vendible outputs (such as hydropower) plus the decreases in expenditures and assistance payments that accrue to the U.S. Treasury because of these USACE Civil Works programs.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) welcomes the new Director of the National Capital Region (NCR) office, Dr. Michael F. Pfenning. In his role as Director of the NCR, Dr. Pfenning also serves as the Deputy Director of IWR. As such, Dr. Pfenning oversees a multi-disciplinary center that includes international programs, navigation, flood risk management, regulatory, and natural resources management. These programs support USACE’s Civil Works (water resources) missions through water resources planning, policy and decision-support model development, as well as training and national/international interface with academia, professional societies, and non-government organizations. Prior to becoming NCR Director, Mike Pfenning was the Program Manager for Water Security at IWR while stationed at the USACE Europe District’s Central Area Office in Sembach, Germany. As IWR’s Program Manager supporting the North Atlantic Division’s (NAD’s) International Water Security Program in the Europe and Africa regions, he provided program management experience, leadership, and interagency collaboration in support of the water security programs of USACE’s key regional stakeholders. He also served as IWR’s Program Manager supporting the Pacific Ocean Division’s (POD’s) International Water Security Program in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.
This paper, just released by the U. S. Army USACE of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR), is a digest and critical review of a recently published report of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) on the Americas (referred to here as the “Americas report”). It is one of four world regional reports that collectively update the U. N. sponsored “Millennium Ecosystem Assessment” of 2005, and its primary goal is to inform policy and decision-making at the highest levels. The Americas report covers the status of biodiversity, ecosystem services and other contributions of nature to human wellbeing. This also includes threats and policy issues in four sub regions. The material in the Americas report is relevant to all missions of the USACE, especially the environmental and restoration missions, and is particularly significant because it is an update of the widely referenced 2005 U. N. sponsored “Millennium Ecosystem Assessment” report. As well, the Americas report introduces potentially influential changes in terminology and concepts, and compiles information of potential use in decision-making at the highest levels of government.
The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources published "Estimating USACE Capital Stock, 1928 to 2016" on the estimated value of water resources infrastructure built by USACE between 1928 and 2016. This includes capital such as dams, levees, harbors and waterway improvements, locks, channels, hydroelectric generating works, and recreation facilities. Each provide an annual stream of benefits to the Nation in the form of transportation costs savings, flood damages prevented, electric power production, water supply storage, recreation, and ecosystem restoration that contribute to national economic prosperity; global competitiveness; and the health, safety, and quality of life of our citizens.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) published “Hawaiian Islands Regional Assessment National Shoreline Management Study” report. This report provides an assessment of the effects of erosion and accretion upon socio-economics and the environment, and what management actions are being taken or are needed to maintain resilient shorelines. The National Shoreline Management Study The Congressionally authorized National Shoreline Management Study (NSMS) is the first undertaking in nearly a half century to document the physical, economic, environmental, and social impacts of shoreline change across each region of the U.S. The NSMS provides government policymakers, coastal engineers and scientists, and stakeholders with information about the coastal regions most in need of resilience planning.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources (IWR) recently released its “California Regional Assessment National Shoreline Management Study” report. This report provides an assessment of the effects of erosion and accretion upon socio-economics and the environment, and what management actions are being taken or are needed to maintain resilient shorelines. The National Shoreline Management Study The Congressionally authorized National Shoreline Management Study (NSMS) is the first undertaking in nearly a half century to document the physical, economic, environmental, and social impacts of shoreline change across each region of the U.S. The NSMS provides government policymakers, coastal engineers and scientists, and stakeholders with information about the coastal regions most in need of resilience planning.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The US Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Institute for Water Resources, in conjunction with its Rock Island District, recently released a report entitled Cedar Rapids Flood Risk Management: A Case Study in Disaster Recovery. The report provides an overview and details of post-flood recovery actions in Cedar Rapids, Iowa following devastating flooding of the Cedar River in June 2008. It also includes observations and lessons regarding U.S. flood risk management drawn from the city’s recovery efforts.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Institute for Water Resources just released a new report, Advances in Conservation Ecology: Paradigm Shifts of Consequence for USACE Environmental Planning, Management and Conservation Cooperation. This report presents a digest of information on recent advances in ecological science and management for USACE ecologists and eco-managers. Advances in conservation ecology are changing the way federal agencies in the United States plan, manage and cooperate to achieve their missions. These advances have contributed to major changes in the widely accepted working concepts—or paradigms—that underlie widely held assumptions of ecological management. Many of these paradigm shifts occurred since USACE environmental policy and technical guidance was written and are unevenly understood among ecological managers (eco-managers).
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Civil and Mechanical Engineering Cadets from the U.S. Military Academy (West Point) gathered at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Headquarters on July 30 as part of a larger five-day program across the east coast to expose them to the USACE mission. The Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was invited to participate in the Washington D.C. morning session to cover subjects in U.S. Water Resources Development, USACE Planning Activities, and Public Participation and Collaboration.

Most Requested

Flood Risk Management Program LinkRisk Analysis Gateway LinkNational Shoreline Management LinkValue to the Nation Link

Learn More about IWR

First Page of Fair Count IWR SectionPage 2 of Fair Count IWR Section

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2 page Article, Faircount Media Group 2018/2019)