Institute for Water Resources

Home
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) offer a plethora of potential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Civil Works Program.  They have been touted to track hurricanes, create 3D maps, protect wildlife, assist farmers, locate archaeological sites, improve metrology, and conduct search and rescue among other applications. More recently, Amazon has claimed that packages will soon be delivered to your front door via a UAS once Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations are lifted. Realistically, it may still be many years before packages are dropped at one’s front door.  Regardless, government agencies and companies alike are starting to explore these capabilities due to some relaxation of FAA restrictions beginning in 2014.  This leads us to question how will this impact the Corps and what is the future of small unmanned aircraft systems within the Corps?
The Institute for Water Resources sought out this question in their new report title “Unmanned Aircraft System Use within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works.”  This report was published on June 29, 2015. It was written as part of an IWR policy research project on planning technologies.  The primary audience for this report is Civil Works within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE); however, those within the UAS field throughout the Army will likely benefit from this report.
Unmanned Aircraft System Considerations within USACE Civil Works
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) offer a plethora of potential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Civil Works Program. They have been touted to track hurricanes, create 3D maps, protect wildlife, assist farmers, locate archaeological sites, improve metrology, and conduct search and rescue among other applications. More recently, Amazon has claimed that packages will soon be delivered to your front door via a UAS once Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations are lifted. Realistically, it may still be many years before packages are dropped at one’s front door. Regardless, government agencies and companies alike are starting to explore these capabilities due to some relaxation of FAA restrictions beginning in 2014. This leads us to question how will this impact the Corps and what is the future of small unmanned aircraft systems within the Corps? The Institute for Water Resources sought out this question in their new report title “Unmanned Aircraft System Use within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works.” This report was published on June 29, 2015. It was written as part of an IWR policy research project on planning technologies. The primary audience for this report is Civil Works within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE); however, those within the UAS field throughout the Army will likely benefit from this report.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  IWR’s International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM) under the auspices of UNESCO helped organize a major photography exhibit this year during the 7th World Water Forum in Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea.  The photographs were displayed at the Citizen’s Forum in Gyeongju and are the works of Mr. Gil Garcetti*, UNESCO-IHE Cultural Ambassador.  The stunning exhibit was co-organized by UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft, The Netherlands; and the goals were to raise awareness and gain new insights to the pivotal role of women as providers and users of water and custodians of the living environment.
Every three years, the World Water Forum mobilizes creativity, innovation, and know-how around water. Serving as a stepping-stone towards global collaboration on water challenges, the Forum is a unique multi-stakeholder platform where the water community and the policy and decision makers from all regions of the world can work together to find joint solutions. It is the largest international event which seeks to advance the cause of water.
IWR’s ICIWaRM Organizes African Photography Exhibit at 7th World Water Forum
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. IWR’s International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM) under the auspices of UNESCO helped organize a major photography exhibit this year during the 7th World Water Forum in Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea. The photographs were displayed at the Citizen’s Forum in Gyeongju and are the works of Mr. Gil Garcetti*, UNESCO-IHE Cultural Ambassador. The stunning exhibit was co-organized by UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft, The Netherlands; and the goals were to raise awareness and gain new insights to the pivotal role of women as providers and users of water and custodians of the living environment. Every three years, the World Water Forum mobilizes creativity, innovation, and know-how around water. Serving as a stepping-stone towards global collaboration on water challenges, the Forum is a unique multi-stakeholder platform where the water community and the policy and decision makers from all regions of the world can work together to find joint solutions. It is the largest international event which seeks to advance the cause of water.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Executive Order 13693 builds on the President’s Climate Action Plan and recent executive orders and calls on The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to initiate the inclusion of environmental sustainability and climate preparedness and resilience into Federal leadership and educational programs in courses and training.  
To answer the call to action, OPM has partnered with the Corps’ Institute for Water Resources (IWR) and they are together leading a cross-sector interagency team that is continues developing and delivering climate and leadership training to not only Senior Executive Service and GS-15 personnel (called for in the Executive Order), but are also making the curriculum available to State, Local, and Tribal leaders consistent with the broader aspirations of the President’s Climate Action Plan.  As part of this program, Dr. Paul Wagner presented a seminar last month entitled “Climate Change for Federal Managers and Senior Leaders.”
The recently developed course “Climate Change and Sustainability for Senior Leaders” has already helped over 500 Senior Executives and senior managers from more than 35 federal agencies improve their abilities to lead their agencies through climate change and sustainability challenges.  A similar course is being developed for delivery through Senior Executive Service Candidate Development (SESCDP) programs, as well as for other executive programs such as The Federal Executive Institute’s (FEI) Leadership for a Democratic Society (LDS).   The importance of Federal leadership in responding to climate change doesn’t rest solely with Senior Executives.  Recognizing this, OPM is developing a climate change and sustainability course for inclusion in our Leadership Education and Development Program.  This multi-day offering will bring together managers and leaders from across the government and beyond and will focus on delivering the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for effective leadership in a changing
IWR Works to Incorporate Climate Change and Sustainability Training into Federal Leadership and Educational Programs
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. Executive Order 13693 builds on the President’s Climate Action Plan and recent executive orders and calls on The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to initiate the inclusion of environmental sustainability and climate preparedness and resilience into Federal leadership and educational programs in courses and training. To answer the call to action, OPM has partnered with the Corps’ Institute for Water Resources (IWR) and they are together leading a cross-sector interagency team that is continues developing and delivering climate and leadership training to not only Senior Executive Service and GS-15 personnel (called for in the Executive Order), but are also making the curriculum available to State, Local, and Tribal leaders consistent with the broader aspirations of the President’s Climate Action Plan. As part of this program, Dr. Paul Wagner presented a seminar last month entitled “Climate Change for Federal Managers and Senior Leaders.” The recently developed course “Climate Change and Sustainability for Senior Leaders” has already helped over 500 Senior Executives and senior managers from more than 35 federal agencies improve their abilities to lead their agencies through climate change and sustainability challenges. A similar course is being developed for delivery through Senior Executive Service Candidate Development (SESCDP) programs, as well as for other executive programs such as The Federal Executive Institute’s (FEI) Leadership for a Democratic Society (LDS). The importance of Federal leadership in responding to climate change doesn’t rest solely with Senior Executives. Recognizing this, OPM is developing a climate change and sustainability course for inclusion in our Leadership Education and Development Program. This multi-day offering will bring together managers and leaders from across the government and beyond and will focus on delivering the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for effective leadership in a changing
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   George Mason University (GMU) held its first annual water symposium on 30 April 2015 at the GMU Fairfax, Virginia campus.  The symposium brought together a range of faculty and students from a variety of disciplines along with county, state and federal representatives that included the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and US Army Corps of Engineers.  
The Symposium highlighted inter-disciplinary water science, engineering, and policy achievements in order to enable water-focused collaborations across the campus and beyond.  The full day program was packed with presentation on topics such as climate adaptation, water management, modeling, and the resources and capabilities available from a variety of agencies.  As part of the discussion, IWR’s Dr. Joe Manous provided an overview of water resources capabilities and activities in which the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is engaged.
IWR’s Dr. Manous Participates in Inaugural 2015 “Mason Water Symposium”
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. George Mason University (GMU) held its first annual water symposium on 30 April 2015 at the GMU Fairfax, Virginia campus. The symposium brought together a range of faculty and students from a variety of disciplines along with county, state and federal representatives that included the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and US Army Corps of Engineers. The Symposium highlighted inter-disciplinary water science, engineering, and policy achievements in order to enable water-focused collaborations across the campus and beyond. The full day program was packed with presentation on topics such as climate adaptation, water management, modeling, and the resources and capabilities available from a variety of agencies. As part of the discussion, IWR’s Dr. Joe Manous provided an overview of water resources capabilities and activities in which the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is engaged.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   USACE’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was a prominent participant in the 18th annual National Mitigation and Ecosystem Banking Conference (MBEC) 5-8 May in Orlando, FL. This national conference focuses on mitigation, conservation, and ecosystem banking to provide offsets for unavoidable impacts to aquatic resources, listed and at-risk species and other natural resources through the restoration, protection, and management of wetlands, streams, and other habitats. 
The 425 attendees included mitigation bank and In-Lieu Fee (ILF) program leads from federal and state agencies, environmental organizations, academia, and the private sector from across the US and 6 nations. District, IWR, and HQUSACE attendees totaled 28, many of whom moderated panels or presented papers. The focus of the conference was on providing current and timely dialogue on third party compensatory mitigation (mitigation and conservation banks and ILF programs) through interactive sessions, panels, moderated forums, and workshops.
Conference Highlights IWR’s Important Contributions to Mitigation Banking
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. USACE’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was a prominent participant in the 18th annual National Mitigation and Ecosystem Banking Conference (MBEC) 5-8 May in Orlando, FL. This national conference focuses on mitigation, conservation, and ecosystem banking to provide offsets for unavoidable impacts to aquatic resources, listed and at-risk species and other natural resources through the restoration, protection, and management of wetlands, streams, and other habitats. The 425 attendees included mitigation bank and In-Lieu Fee (ILF) program leads from federal and state agencies, environmental organizations, academia, and the private sector from across the US and 6 nations. District, IWR, and HQUSACE attendees totaled 28, many of whom moderated panels or presented papers. The focus of the conference was on providing current and timely dialogue on third party compensatory mitigation (mitigation and conservation banks and ILF programs) through interactive sessions, panels, moderated forums, and workshops.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has released a Comparison of 2014 Adaptation Plans report prepared in conjunction with Booz Allen Hamilton. This report compares the thirty-eight Adaptation Plans submitted to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in 2014, per the release of the President’s Climate Action Plan (PCAP) in June 2013, and Executive Order (EO) 13653, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change, in November 2013, which brought with them new requirements for agencies to improve climate change preparedness and resilience.
The comparison was undertaken to provide USACE staff with information about other agency climate preparedness and resilience actions to facilitate partnering and information sharing, identify actions taken by agencies with aligned missions and operations that could be useful to us, and support a gap analysis to guide future actions. This comparison of 2014 Adaptation Plans was undertaken to provide USACE staff with information about other agency climate preparedness and resilience actions to facilitate partnering and information sharing, identify actions taken by agencies with aligned missions and operations that could be useful to us, and support a gap analysis to guide future actions. It is not intended to be a comprehensive comparison, rather an information resource to combine with other more detailed data.
Comparison of 2014 Adaptation Plans Released
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has released a Comparison of 2014 Adaptation Plans report prepared in conjunction with Booz Allen Hamilton. This report compares the thirty-eight Adaptation Plans submitted to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in 2014, per the release of the President’s Climate Action Plan (PCAP) in June 2013, and Executive Order (EO) 13653, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change, in November 2013, which brought with them new requirements for agencies to improve climate change preparedness and resilience. The comparison was undertaken to provide USACE staff with information about other agency climate preparedness and resilience actions to facilitate partnering and information sharing, identify actions taken by agencies with aligned missions and operations that could be useful to us, and support a gap analysis to guide future actions. This comparison of 2014 Adaptation Plans was undertaken to provide USACE staff with information about other agency climate preparedness and resilience actions to facilitate partnering and information sharing, identify actions taken by agencies with aligned missions and operations that could be useful to us, and support a gap analysis to guide future actions. It is not intended to be a comprehensive comparison, rather an information resource to combine with other more detailed data.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   In the late summer months of 2011, just as the historic Missouri flood stages finally receded in the US, a tropical storm hit the Chao Phraya river basin in Thailand.  The flood in Thailand killed more than 800 people, displaced more than 13 million, and caused more than $46 billion of damage in and around Bangkok, according to a World Bank report.  After the flood, Thailand’s Royal Irrigation District (RID), began discussions with USACE about flood prediction technology.
In May 2015, RID hosted two members of the CEIWR-HEC-RAS (Hydrologic Engineering Center’s River Analysis Systems software) team, Cameron Ackerman and Stanford Gibson, and representatives from the Pacific Ocean Division (POD) John Emmerson and Jim Ligh.  The USACE team visited RID in Bangkok to conduct an introductory flood modeling workshop.  Over fifty, mostly early career engineers, from RID and the Thai Army participated in the three and a half day workshop.
HEC Offers an Introductory River Modeling Workshop for Thailand’s Royal Irrigation District
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. In the late summer months of 2011, just as the historic Missouri flood stages finally receded in the US, a tropical storm hit the Chao Phraya river basin in Thailand. The flood in Thailand killed more than 800 people, displaced more than 13 million, and caused more than $46 billion of damage in and around Bangkok, according to a World Bank report. After the flood, Thailand’s Royal Irrigation District (RID), began discussions with USACE about flood prediction technology. In May 2015, RID hosted two members of the CEIWR-HEC-RAS (Hydrologic Engineering Center’s River Analysis Systems software) team, Cameron Ackerman and Stanford Gibson, and representatives from the Pacific Ocean Division (POD) John Emmerson and Jim Ligh. The USACE team visited RID in Bangkok to conduct an introductory flood modeling workshop. Over fifty, mostly early career engineers, from RID and the Thai Army participated in the three and a half day workshop.
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   PIANC USA was instrumental in planning, organizing, and securing a place in the World Water Forum* Technical Program for Session 1.4.7 – Waterborne Infrastructure for Sustainable Transport and Economic Development.  The session was moderated by Mr. Geoffroy Caude, President of PIANC International, who spoke on Sustainability in the Inland Waterborne Transport Sector.  Mr. Jim McCarville, a PIANC USA Commissioner, delivered a presentation on U.S. Waterway Infrastructure – Investments and Benefits.  Other presentations focused on the River Rhine, the Gyeongin Ara Waterway in the Republic of Korea, and the Parana-Paraguay Waterway in South America.  
The U.S. presentation highlighted the important role which navigation played in the ‘nation building’ phase of U.S. development.  It also discussed how river transport was used to increase U.S. economic competitiveness in world trade, more recent concerns about environmental sustainability, and the place for water transport within integrated water resources management.
Using Rivers for Transport – PIANC Session at the 7th World Water Forum in Republic of Korea
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. PIANC USA was instrumental in planning, organizing, and securing a place in the World Water Forum* Technical Program for Session 1.4.7 – Waterborne Infrastructure for Sustainable Transport and Economic Development. The session was moderated by Mr. Geoffroy Caude, President of PIANC International, who spoke on Sustainability in the Inland Waterborne Transport Sector. Mr. Jim McCarville, a PIANC USA Commissioner, delivered a presentation on U.S. Waterway Infrastructure – Investments and Benefits. Other presentations focused on the River Rhine, the Gyeongin Ara Waterway in the Republic of Korea, and the Parana-Paraguay Waterway in South America. The U.S. presentation highlighted the important role which navigation played in the ‘nation building’ phase of U.S. development. It also discussed how river transport was used to increase U.S. economic competitiveness in world trade, more recent concerns about environmental sustainability, and the place for water transport within integrated water resources management.

Inside the Institute

PIANC USA Silver Jackets Responses to Climate Change
Flood Risk Management Program Corps Risk Analysis Gateway Shared Vision Planning
Water Resources Training
            and Education International Center for
            Integrated Water Resources Management National Shoreline Management Study
Inland Waterways Users Board National Economic Development Manuals Navigation Economics
            Technologies Program
Sustainable Rivers Project Value to the Nation Port and Inland Waterways Modernization Strategy

Latest Stories

Unmanned Aircraft System Considerations within USACE Civil Works

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) offer a plethora of potential for the U.S.
Published: 6/30/2015

IWR’s ICIWaRM Organizes African Photography Exhibit at 7th World Water Forum

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.  IWR’s International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management
Published: 6/30/2015

IWR Works to Incorporate Climate Change and Sustainability Training into

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   Executive Order 13693 builds on the President’s Climate Action Plan and
Published: 6/29/2015

IWR’s Dr. Manous Participates in Inaugural 2015 “Mason Water Symposium”

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   George Mason University (GMU) held its first annual water symposium on 30
Published: 6/29/2015

Conference Highlights IWR’s Important Contributions to Mitigation Banking

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   USACE’s Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was a prominent participant in
Published: 6/23/2015

Comparison of 2014 Adaptation Plans Released

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has released a Comparison of 2014
Published: 6/12/2015

HEC Offers an Introductory River Modeling Workshop for Thailand’s Royal Irrigation District

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA.   In the late summer months of 2011, just as the historic Missouri flood
Published: 6/9/2015

Photos