News Story Manager

  • June

    Eugene Stakhiv Speaks at United Nations Water and Climate Change Workshop

    ALEXANDRIA, VA – June 1, 2010. Dr. Eugene Stakhiv spoke at the Workshop on Water and Climate Change
  • April

    Risk Analysis Gateway Website Launched

    ALEXANDRIA, VA – April 5, 2010. When and where will the next major flood occur? Will project bids
  • March

    Stacy Langsdale to Receive 2010 EWRI Award for Best Policy-Oriented Paper

    ALEXANDRIA, VA – March 15, 2010. Stacy Langsdale, PhD, along with co-authors Allyson Beall, PhD,
  • M. Gordon Reds Wolman Dies at 85

    M. Gordon "Reds" WolmanALEXANDRIA, VA – March 1, 2010. Last week on February 24, at the age of 85,
  • February

    IWR Signs Memorandum of Understanding with Florida International University

    WASHINGTON, DC – February 5, 2010. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
  • January

    Projects restore floodplain ecosystems while reducing flood risk

    Floodplains are extremely productive ecosystems that support high levels of biodiversity and provide valuable ecosystem services that directly benefit society. One high profile study concluded floodplains ranked second among ecosystem types based on the monetary value of their ecosystem services, which include flood attenuation, fisheries, groundwater recharge, water filtration and recreation. However, to function as diverse, productive ecosystems, floodplains must periodically flood.
  • October

    New technology improves river management

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy have joined forces to develop the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s Regime Prescription Tool, software to help teams reach agreements on managing the flow regime of a river. The idea for this software was conceived during a Sustainable Rivers Project workshop, where scientists worked together to formulate a set of ecosystem flow recommendations needed to sustain or restore ecosystems connected to the river.
  • July

    Joint project looks at Texas watershed

    A large portion of the central United States is still under drought conditions, which has forced many to protect and preserve the current sources of water and to seek future sources. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District has agreed to work with numerous resource organizations to study how reservoir operations have affected ecological conditions in the Big Cypress Bayou and Caddo Lake in the piney woods of east Texas.
  • Willamette River, Oregon: Moving Toward Basin-Wide Flow and Floodplain Restoration

    INTRODUCTION Over the last 50 years, river management has evolved from an emphasis on economic
  • Savannah River, Georgia: Science to Support Adaptive Implementation of Environmental Flows to a Large Coastal River, Floodplain, and Estuary

    INTRODUCTION Rivers of the Southeastern United States traverse a wide coastal plain where they are
  • Bill Williams River, Arizona: Restoring Natural Variability in an Arid Lands River

    A truism of managing natural systems is that Mother knows best. This is being applied to the
  • Green River, Kentucky, Conservation Project

    How can something exist and not exist at the same time, effect change yet remain almost invisible
  • Models and Software for Supporting Ecologically Sustainable Water Management

    Models and software for supporting ecologically sustainable water management - As awareness leads to improved scientific understanding (and vice versa), more strategies linking water and ecosystem management will be identified, which will in turn become new analytical challenges for software tools.
  • Incorporating Environmental Flows into Water Management

    Feature: Incorporating environmental flows into water management - Environmental flows defined using the Savannah Process explicitly ignore all real or perceived constraints to their immediate implementation, including those that are physical, legal, social, political, or financial.
  • Water: One Resource, Many Uses

    This originally appeared in a collaborative effort issue of IMPACT with The Nature Conservancy’s Sustainable Waters Program to highlight the cutting-edge work and research the program is conducting. I would like to give a big thanks to Nicole Silk and Andrew Warner of The Nature Conservancy for their hard work in organizing this unique and informative issue as well as their continued dedication to river protection.
  • Introduction: Environmental Flows

    Introduction: Environmental Flows - Allocating water for diverse and often competing traditional uses for water (e.g., industry, agriculture, urban, energy, etc.) is now even more complex due to the implications of climate change. Society’s expectation that ecosystem health receive adequate attention and accommodation has expanded this equation even further.
  • April

    Joint team travels to China

    Stan Simpson, a Corps water manager for the Savannah River Basin, recently joined a team from the Conservancy and traveled to China, where a series of dams on the Yangtze are planned. The Conservancy is conducting a series of workshops, led by Andy Warner, to define the environmental flow needs of the river and to find a way to meet the needs of nature and the growing Chinese population, so both can continue to thrive.
  • January

    Corps and The Nature Conservancy develop joint training

    The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) are working together to develop training courses that emphasize connections between hydrology and ecology and to outline how those connections can be taken into account in water resource management. Currently, two courses are offered as joint training opportunities, with each course being held once a year through the Corps’ Learning Center.
  • October

    Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem

    This is the third in a series of articles about the Sustainable Rivers Partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy. In 2002, the Corps implemented an interim plan designed with The Nature Conservancy to create more natural regimes of flow and stream temperature by changing the ways that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved and officially integrated into the water management policies of Louisville District.
  • Ecosystem flows defined for Bill Williams River

    Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of articles about the Sustainable Rivers Partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy. The Bill Williams River was one of nine rivers enrolled at the inception of the Sustainable Rivers Project (SRP). The SRP, which started in 2002, is an ongoing nationwide partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and The Nature Conservancy to improve the health and life of rivers by changing the operations of Corps dams, while maintaining or enhancing project benefits.